not my jumprope (test)

What you'll need
Ice Roller
Mario Badescu Facial Spray (Aloe, Cucumber & Green Tea) 4fl Oz
Steps
1.
Spritz on your facial spray.
2.
With an upward motion, bring the ice roller from your chin to the side of your face.
3.
Use the ice roller on your cheeks.
4.
Use it on your eyelids to help them depuff too.
5.
Use the ice roller in an upward motion on your forehead.
6.
Bring the ice roller down on your neck.
7.
Finish it off by bringing the ice roller upward from your chin to the side of your face (again).

not my jumprope (test)

Steps

1.
I’m preparing my skin using Kypris Serum, it’s so wonderful for dew and moisture. I got it on Boxy
2.
For my base I’m using Pretty Fresh Hyaluronic Acid Tinted Moisturizer, beautiful finish and fresh
3.
For my under eyes I’m using Juvia’s Place I am Magic Concealer, It’s so creamy and long lasting
4.
For setting my makeup I’m using Wet N Wild Photofocus Translucent Powder, it’s very light, love it
5.
To bronze I’m using Park Ave Princess from Tarte, I love the formula, smells so good, got it on box
6.
I’m using My Sun and Stars Blush from Colourpop, it’s my go to for everything!
7.
I always use this Eyebrow Pencil from Colourpop, I love how thin and precise it is, formula is great
8.
For shadow I’m only using this one from Dose of Colors on shade Block Party, very Sparkly!
9.
Moving to my liner using BFF Liquid Liner in Numero Uno from Colourpop, I love it! So pigmented!
10.
For mascara I’ve been loving Big Ego Mascara from Tarte, gives me lots of volume!
11.
For highlighter I’m using Mystery Skin Frost Highlighter from Jeffree Star, love the glow!
12.
Lastly, on my lips I’m using Lippie Stix in shade Silk Matte from Colourpop, love all their lippies

Not my jumprope (test)

What you’ll need

Butter Pecan Cake Mix
1 Cup Butter
1 Cup Water
3 Egg Yolks
5 Egg Whites
Donut Pan
Non-Stick Spray
Bacon
Powdered (Confectioners) Sugar
Heavy Whipping Cream
Maple Syrup
Cinnamon

Steps

1.
Sift your cake mix into the bowl
2.
Add 1 cup melted butter
3.
Add 1 cup of water
4.
Add 3 egg yolks
5.
Mix ingredients together
6.
Whip 5 egg whites until stiff peaks form
7.
Fold in egg whites until blended
8.
Fill a resealable bag with dough and snip the corner
9.
Pipe near to the top into a greased donut pan
10.
Bake at 350 F for 12 – 15 minutes
11.
Cook your bacon until your desired crispiness
12.
Lay cooked bacon on a plate and soak up grease with a paper towel
13.
Crumble up bacon into little pieces, munch on some for maximum joy
14.
Glaze: Mix .75 cups sugar, 4 TB maple syrup, 1 TB heavy cream, dash of cinnamon until smooth
15.
Drizzle glaze over cooled donuts- you can also use a piping bag for better precision
16.
Place bacon crumbles on top of wet glaze

Hi, again…

My mom’s been recovering from ankle reconstructive surgery. It’s going to be a really painful next few months and I really feel for her. Since she’s laid up in bed, she’s been reading everything she can while I try my best to be on her good side. The other day, after apparently googling our whole family, she called me on the phone with bitterness in her voice. She told me she was ‘pissed off’ I never told her about this blog.

Which reminded me, I started this blog as an online home for my thoughts, ramblings, and weird ideas as a sort of journal to come back to. I never used it for it’s worth. In 2019, I think I published 2 posts. People have created followings and digital personas on the internet that have helped them tremendously in their careers. I don’t intend to do that. Instead, I want to do what this blog was originally set out for. I want to start sharing my thoughts, ramblings and weird ideas. Most importantly, I want to exercise the part of my body that hasn’t been getting enough attention, my writing muscles.

Growing up, I wasn’t enamored with technology. I was usually outside playing sports, or running from friends backyard to backyard. Playstation and xbox sat idly by while I perfected my free throws and curveballs. Books were common, but only until I attended college did the internet, cloud, and tech make a breakthrough in my life. Before meeting some more tech-minded friends, I was certain I would work at the intersection of the arts and something profound. I prided myself on my writing ability and persuasion with the pen and paper. Nowadays, I notice those skills fading.

Even though I get to write my fair share of emails and more short-form twitter literature, I miss exercising my creative and more eloquent writing muscles that have been neglected by limiting myself to only produce what needed to be completed for work.

So let’s hope that this isn’t the only post I make in 2020.  

Kelly Slater didn’t consider product market fit

On May 5th, 2018, The World Surf League (WSL) held a tournament in a peculiar place. Landlocked and over 100 miles from the sea, the top competitors in the world gathered in Lemoore, California for what would go on to create a unique surfing-only type notation system. Since I haven’t seen anyone else coin this phrase, I’m going to make it my own: B.K.E – Before Kelly’s Era.

Kelly Slater is undoubtedly the king of surfing. He’s both the youngest and oldest person to win a world title, amassing an astounding 11 world championships. It’s safe to say his bald head has seen a lot. Kelly is a polarizing figure in the world of surfing – he’s been the driver behind much of surfing’s recent comeback, as well as the sports commercialization and prior downturn. Like Kelly, there are two sides to everything. Surfing is no different. With the advent of high-priced surfing technologies in the form of boards that make wave riding easier, wetsuits that keep surfers warmer for longer, and even earplugs that offset surfers’ ear, technology is segmenting the surfing population.

Traditionalists believe in an old-school view of a wave-riding hierarchy where those who’ve surfed the mush should have priority over visitors when the stars align. To them, surfing is a holistic, spell-binding ritual where surfers interact with an ever-changing wave that evolves with the ocean floor and wind. The boards they ride come from shapers who spend hours meticulously crafting every inch of the foam.

On the other hand, contemporary surfers, believe in almost nothing. There’s no rhythm or rhyme to when someone is supposed to drop-in. Beaches are littered with massively produced assembly-line boards with Go-Pro cameras stapled to the nose. There are meme pages associated with novice contemporary surfer. Often times you’ll see the newest Rip Curl wetsuit on someone holding a board with the fins on backward. It seems like surfers of today resemble a cutout of what technology has done to much of America.

There’s nothing wrong with either segmentation. Often times, traditionalists are assholes and contemporary surfers are dangerously ignorant just trying to have fun. The main point is that technology is impacting surfing in an unprecedented way. However, the debate among surfers as to where they should buy their boards from, or whether or not they were tough enough to last in the cold ocean is over. The new debate is no longer man vs. man, but instead, man vs. machine.

Flashback to December 5th, 2015 when Kelly unveiled his ten-year-long experiment to the world. A video was released showing him surfing a perfectly shaped artificial wave being ridden in none other than Lenmoore, California. The quest for the worlds perfect wave has ended. It’s not in Tavarua or Teahupoo, but in Lemoore California, and it could be coming to your backyard.

When Kelly unleashed the video back in 2015, the world flipped on its axis. The traditionalists condemned it – the contemporaries loved it – but everyone wanted to try it.

Here’s how the wave works. 

  1. A 100-ton hydrofoil – named “The Vehicle” – run down a track with the help of more than 150 truck tires and at around 18 miles per hour (30 kilometers per hour);
  2. When the swell hits specific areas of the lake’s bottom, the wave starts to break thanks to the influence of the contour reefs
  3. Giant lateral gutters mitigate the bounce-back effect that occurs on the pool walls forming the wave
  4. It takes three minutes for the surf pool water to calm down and return to a completely static state

Today, the wave pool costs about $9,500/hour, plus an additional $288 booking fee. A high price for retail, but this is just the beginning. Have the stars all of a sudden aligned for surfings newest innovation? Or was it strategically positioned for global distribution? The 2020 Olympics will be held in Japan, and with surfing on the docket for the first time as an Olympic event, Kelly Slater’s Wave Pool technology is ripe for the masses. 



Normally, surfers head to event locations weeks in advance to prepare for the upcoming tournament. Similarly, tournaments could last weeks at a time because of the sports unpredictable X factor – the waves. In surfing, scoring is subjective and with each wave, rides are incomparable – up until now.

Now, surfers can be scrutinized on a fair playing field, one in which every rider has the same course. Along with its technical predictability for unadjusted scoring, the artificial wave comes with a massive pool – one that’s ~700 meters long and 100 meters wide. At the recent WSL event, spectators came to what could be easily confused as a soccer stadium with big screen televisions publicizing every angle of the event.

Still, the International Olympic Committee, International Surfing Association and Tokyo 2020 maintain that surfing’s debut will take place in the ocean.

Despite being acquired by WSL Holdings in 2016 for an undisclosed price, kswaveco was an arduous project to undergo. It took $30M, ten years, and multiple iterations. Kelly brought the passion, and Adam Fincham, Associate Professor of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering at the University of Southern California brought the brains. There were no feedback loops, UAT, or product market fit analyses. It’s now up to the consumers to decide whether or not this is something that will complement ocean surfing, or disrupt it. There will either be kswaveco country clubs, or just the infamous one. 


Thinking about SEMs before bed

Recently, I’ve been reading about SaaS-enabled marketplaces. I’m mostly interested in whether or not some of the great SEMs of today strategically set out to create these competitive moats, or if they stumbled into it.

Chris Dixon argues that Instagram is one of the easiest examples to understand. At the time, Instagram was the best place to get free filters for photos. He argues that users came for the filter, but stayed for the network. What started as a tool (the filter) turned into a network (feed). The network enabled a premier online marketplace for programmatic advertising and retail sales.

Snapchat, on the other hand, never made it there. With a clunky UX and a prophecy to remain loyal to its original MVP, knowing where your friends are, missed out on this opportunity. I’m a big fan of Snapchat and think it has merit in the market, but it would have been interesting to see an advance in their original business model to include such capabilities. With a potential Amazon acquisition, this just might happen.

Even if Snapchat gets acquired, it won’t matter. Instagram won in a zero-sum game. The next frontier of marketplaces will lie within the physical realm. One where I could imagine using vitals and real-life experiences to make recommendations/drive sales.

If your Apple Watch knew you just ran 5 miles and was hooked up to your Meal Pal app, it could remind you to order something with more protein in it because you need it to fuel your day. Or, if you had your phone connected to all apps, and it was Jon’s birthday, it could remind me his favorite baseball team is the Mets (since he posts on facebook about it so much), and I could buy tickets for him since they’re in town.

The winner of the marketplace will be the company that understands the consumer and can predict what they’ll want through data-driven insights.

It’s a bit far fetched to think people would be okay with giving their phone all that access, but it would be a superior marketplace. You wouldn’t have to come for the network, because you’re always plugged into it.